Who Do I Tell About My Promotion Application?

THE QUESTION: The company you work for has a new opening, and you meet the qualifications for it. This position would be a promotion for you. You decide to apply and are confident about your chances. You find out that an internal search committee has been formed to coordinate the search and interview process for this position. In addition to your apparent good fortune, you discover that Mike, one of the committee members, is a friend of yours.

 

WHAT’S YOUR ANSWER?
A.  You apply for the position and inform Mike and the committee so that he has the opportunity to excuse himself during the review/interview process and avoid a conflict of interest. 

B.  You apply for the position and let the process unfold on its own, without notifying Mike or anyone else that you have a friend on the committee.

C.  You apply for the position, and ask Mike for advice, especially about the interview portion like whether he knows of any direct questions that may be asked, and to put in a good word for you.

D.  You apply for the position, but you talk to your supervisor about the fact that you have a friend on the search committee and ask for advice on how to proceed.

 

WHAT’S MY ANSWER?

I picked B.  You apply for the position and let the process unfold on its own, without notifying Mike or anyone else that you have a friend on the committee.

 

I feel like I can trust that their is a rocess in place that handels these sorts of situations as they aren’t too uncommon. If not and it’s a problem to be friends with somebody on the committee, I would encourage and trust Mike to speak up. 

 

Well, what do you think? Agree? Disagree? Let me know your answer and why in the comments below.

 

Click here to read an evaluation of this Dilemma from Fulvio Di Blasi, a world-renown scholar in the field of applied philosophy and business ethics.  

 

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